OCHH Past Conference Experience

Thank you to all of you that attended 

The 2018 OCHH Annual Conference!

You are the reason our conferences are great! 

"All Roads Lead Home"

September 26-28, 2018

 

Keynote Speakers

 

Joshua Groesz MS

Social Services Director

Cascade Division

The Salvation Army

 

At 17, Josh joined the Oregon Army National Guard and was later attached to the First Calvary Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. After six years of service, he earned a Master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling to become a National Certified Counselor. Professionally, he spent two years as the program director for the Military Helpline, a 24-hour crisis line for veterans, and over 5 years of teaching experience from Portland Community College and Clark College. Currently, he is the Social Services Director for The Salvation Army’s Cascade Division and provides consultation for all Salvation Army shelters in Oregon and Idaho. Previously, he spent two years as the Executive Director of The Salvation Army’s Veterans and Family Center, a transitional and permanent housing facility for veterans and their families. He spends his down time with wife, Chrissy, and two daughters, Mia and Simone. 

 

Tyrone Poole

President & Founder

OneApp

 

Tyrone Poole, founder of NoAppFee.com, didn’t develop his concept in a sleek Silicon Valley incubator. He developed it in a Portland homeless shelter, as a resident. Nine years ago, while training to become a fireman, Tyrone suffered a serious leg injury that put him in a hospital bed for nine months and on crutches for nearly a year. Upon his release he had lost everything. He was evicted, his car had been repossessed, and he had incurred over twenty thousand dollars in medical debt. After months of couch surfing he found himself checked in to the YWCA homeless shelter. This is where NoAppFee was founded. He worked as a housing advocate for the shelter, whilst being a resident, to find low income and homeless families’ places to live. 

Kenny LaPoint, Assistant Director, Public Affairs for Oregon Housing and Community Services

 

Kenny has over 13 years of housing and community development experience. Prior to his service with the State of Oregon, Mr. LaPoint spent six years as the Housing and Resident Services Director for Housing Works, the Central Oregon Regional Housing Authority. Mr. LaPoint also served for over three years as a Homeownership Counselor for NeighborImpact, Central Oregon’s Community Action Agency.  Other prior service includes Co-Chair of Central Oregon’s Homeless Leadership Coalition (the region’s Continuum of Care); a member of the City of Bend’s Affordable Housing Committee, President of the Cascade Chapter of NAHRO (National Association of Housing Redevelopment Officials), Neighborhood Partnership’s Board of Directors, member of the Community Advisory Council for Central Oregon’s Coordinated Care Organization and one of the founding members of Icon City, a Central Oregon non-profit organization. 

 

Conference Sponsors

 

Red Diamond Sponsors

 

OCHH Welcomes Back & Sincerely Thanks Our Returning Sponsor

 

Diamond Sponsors

 

 

Alexandrite Sponsors

 

 

Fire Opal Sponsors

 

 

Scholarship Sponsors

 

Conference at a Glance 2018
2018 Conference At A Glance-F.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [162.8 KB]

OCHH CONFERENCE OFFERING SOAR WORKS INSTITUTE

SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access and Recovery

 

SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access and Recovery (SOAR) is an approach that helps states increase access to mainstream benefits for people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness through strategic planning, training and technical assistance. (See workshops below for more information) For more information on SOAR Works click link below:

https://soarworks.prainc.com/states/oregon

 Workshops

 

2018 Conference Workshops & Presenters

 

 

Aimee Walsh, Direction Service

 

The Youth House: A Collective Impact Response to Support Unhoused and Unaccompanied Youth in Our Community

 

As member organizations of The 15th Night collective impact initiative in our community, Direction Service, St. Vincent de Paul, and Hosea Youth Services united to develop an innovative program to provide transitional housing via independent studio apartments situated in a house like environment, along with mentoring, skill-building and high-fidelity wraparound planning. Unaccompanied youth between 16-18 are provided any needed supports and services to ensure successful transition into independent adulthood.

 

Aimee Walsh has been with Direction Service for nineteen years and is currently serving as the Chief Executive Officer. She previously served in several roles, including Director of Family Services for more than ten years and launched the Wraparound Facilitation program for children and youth with significant behavioral health needs almost four years ago. Aimee received an M.S. in Special Education at the University of Oregon where she conducted research in the areas of family involvement and collaboration. She has spent nearly two decades studying, working and advocating for children, youth and families who experience disability or special needs.

 

Josh Frank is the Project Coordinator with Hosea Youth Services. Josh attended the University of Oregon where he earned a Bachelor's degree in Psychology. A native of Eugene, Josh is dedicated to caring for the wellbeing of its citizens.

 

Eileen Chanti holds a Masters in Teaching, with a focus in teacher leadership and educational equity from the University of Chicago. While living in Chicago, Eileen worked within Chicago Public Schools as a teacher and teacher leader. Prior to taking on the role of Youth and Family Services Director at SVDP, she was the director of First Place Kids, First Place Family Center’s trauma-informed early childhood program for homeless children and their families. First Place kids serves over 130 kids a year and is open Monday through Friday, ensuring that young children and their families have the support and care necessary for equitable outcomes compared to their housed peers. As the Director of Youth and Family Services for St Vincent de Paul of Lane County, Eileen oversees First Place Family Center, a homeless family day center, the Night Shelter Annex for Families, and the Youth House for girls.

 

Dan Bryant, SquareOne Villages

 

It Takes a Community to Build a Village

 

Using tiny homes for affordable housing is about much more than saving money by building small. A successful village of tiny homes takes a community to build it AND building a community among the residents that live in it. Building community with tiny homes is a real solution to the affordable housing crisis.

 

Dan Bryant is a minister of First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Eugene, Oregon and the Executive Director of SquareOne Villages, a non-profit that he helped to establish that creates self-managed communities of low-cost tiny homes for people in need of housing. He has received awards from Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, the Jewish Federation of Lane County, Catholic Community Services, the United Way of Lane County, the Eugene Human Rights Commission, Pineros y Campesinos Unidos, the Nobel Peace Laureate Project and the Lane County Chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill.

 

Jimmy Jones, The ARCHES Project, Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency

 

Using Coordinated Entry in a Co-Location Environment: Bridging a High Needs Housing Program with an Integrated Service Model

 

The ARCHES Project is the point of entry for the City of Salem's high needs chronically homeless housing project, dedicated to housing 160 of the highest needs clients in the community. The Project also opened a new day center dedicated to providing the chronically homeless with integrated services from many agencies across the Social Domains of Health. This presentation is the story of the deliberate connections between our housing program, assessment protocols, and service strategy.

 

Jimmy Jones is the Director of the ARCHES Project in Salem. He designed the Coordinated Entry model in use across the Rural Oregon Continuum of Care and manages 22 grants for 14 housing programs in Marion and Polk Counties. He is also the lead for the Cascade VAT Team, which looks to house the most vulnerable, long term chronically homeless in the Salem area.

 

Breezy Aguirre is the Coordinated Entry Specialist and Program Manager at the ARCHES Project in Salem. She oversees the development and implementation of Coordinated Entry across much of Oregon, and personally leads the Marion-Polk Coordinated Entry Project.

 

Ashley Hamilton is a Program Manager at the ARCHES Project in Salem. She manages the Cascade Housing Project, an innovative rapid-rehousing approach to chronically homeless clients in Marion and Polk Counties. She manages the ARCHES Project in Polk County, and designed the innovative co-located Day Center Project based on the Social Determinants of Health, at the ARCHES Project in Salem.

 

Shyle Ruder, Fair Housing Council of Oregon

 

Fair Housing and Disability

 

Fair Housing laws protect people from illegal discrimination in housing. Individuals with disabilities qualify for certain protections when disability creates a housing barrier. This workshop includes:
• Fair Housing Basics
• The protected class of disability
• Reasonable Accommodations and Modifications
• What housing providers need to consider to determine what is reasonable

 

Shyle Ruder is the Education and Outreach Director at the Fair Housing Council of Oregon. Prior to her work at FHCO, Shyle worked in HIV/AIDS Services for 17 years with 14 of those years focused on housing services for people living with HIV/AIDS. As part of that work, she has taught about Fair Housing rights since 2006. Shyle served on the Renters Education Alliance Committee for seven years and helped develop the Rent Well tenant education series, an intensive 15-hour course designed to teach individuals their rights and responsibilities as renters. She recently graduated PSU with a Master’s degree in Postsecondary Adult Continuing Education.

 

Alison McIntosh, Neighborhood Partnerships and the Oregon Housing Alliance

 

Creating change through State Legislative Advocacy and Strategic Communications

 

The 2019 Oregon Legislative session will be critical for housing advocates as they seek to address big housing issues facing people across Oregon. Join this session to get the scoop on what's being proposed in Salem for 2019, how you can participate, and become a more effective advocate.

 

Alison serves as the Deputy Director for Policy & Communications where she leads the work of the Oregon Housing Alliance, a legislative advocacy coalition working to ensure all Oregonians have a safe and stable home. From 2014-2016, Alison served as the Government Relations and Communications Liaison at Oregon Housing and Community Services, where she helped lead the agency's legislative work and served as the agency Spokeswoman. Alison served at NP from 2006 - 2014, and in that role worked on advocacy, communications, and policy analysis. She coordinated the work of the Housing Alliance and advised NP's initial work on asset building. Alison began working for non-profit organizations in 2001 as a community organizer in Minnesota. After moving to Portland in 2003, Alison gained experience in local housing issues as a volunteer and Board member for the Portland-based Community Alliance of Tenants. She holds a BA in Political Science from Macalester College in Minnesota.

 

Dylan Weil, Community Outreach through Radical Empowerment (CORE)

 

Best Practices for addressing the needs of homeless young adults

 

A discussion of youth and young adult homelessness with a focus on 16-24-year olds in Lane County. Thousands of youth and young adults in Oregon are not receiving the care, attention, and services they need in order to lead happy and healthy lives. What can we do as a community to better meet the needs of young people in Oregon. Specifically, we will talk about what these efforts look like through the lens of an emerging non-profit. We will explore the stigmas surrounding youth homelessness as well as the reasons why specified programming is necessary to meet the needs of a broad population. The purpose of this is to engage and encourage conversation about what our community can do to better serve our young people.

 

Dylan Weil, CORE Outreach Director, recently moved from his hometown of Seattle to Eugene. He has been working in the social and human services field for over three years with a background of agriculture, food service, and photojournalism. He studied photojournalism at Western Washington University and social justice at Fairhaven Interdisciplinary College. He has worked as a Lead at a crisis intervention center for young adults supervising overnight staff at an emergency shelter. He has also worked in drop-in centers, outreach programs, and transitional living facilities. Recently Dylan has co-founded Community Outreach through Racial Empowerment, a non-profit organization based out of Eugene dedicated to supporting, advocating, and empowering young adults. In addition to CORE Dylan works as a Food Services Coordinator at a local youth non-profit in Eugene.

 

Brittney Ferara is a native Seattleite. She moved to Eugene OR in August of 2017. She has been working in the social and human services field for ten years. She has worked as a shelter worker, drop-in staff, case manager (housing, employment, CESC, education, shelter, etc.) as well as a program manager of a crisis intervention center where she supervised shelter, drop-in, outreach workers and case managers. Brittney has primarily worked with homeless youth and young adults as well as families. When Brittney moved to Eugene she helped co-found Community Outreach through Racial Empowerment, a non-profit organization based out of Eugene dedicated to supporting, advocating, and empowering young adults. In addition to CORE Brittney works at a local Eugene nonprofit as the Outreach Coordinator.
Brittney also has a bachelor’s of social and human services with a focus on social justice from the Evergreen state college in Olympia, WA.

 

Layni Campbell, Looking Glass Community Services

 

Intersections of Runaway & Homeless Youth and Sex Trafficking-how trauma effects our choices

 

Runaway and Homeless Youth are extreme risk for being trafficked almost immediately finding themselves on the streets. Learn about Oregon state law regarding this hard to work population and the realities they face on the streets and in the juvenile justice system.

 

Layni Campbell, Trafficking Prevention Specialist, has experience working with Runaway and Homeless youth, street outreach and trafficking prevention. She is a community educator and advocate for disenfranchised communities. Her position was the first of its kind working with youth in Lane County.

 

Tricia Ratliff, Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action's HOME Youth & Resource Center

 

Challenge Accepted: Addressing Youth Homelessness Begins with 100 Days

 

100 days; 3 months give or take. What’s possible in 100 days? Join a few of the Marion County team in reviewing the Challenge structure, successes, lessons learned, and tips for beginning a similar initiative. Hear about next steps, an option for localized TA, and have opportunity to ask questions.

 

Tricia Ratliff is the Program Director for Community Action's HOME Youth & Resource Center in Salem, Oregon. She has loved the 13 years she's spent working in youth and community education, with the past 5 years being her favorite working directly with homeless youth.

 

Brian Schimmel, Old Town Forest Grove, Forest Grove Temporary Emergency Shelters

 

Innovative Resourcing: Best Practices for University Partnerships

 

To make sustainable, long-term change, service programs to rehabilitate the homeless need to offset costs while expanding services. Speakers will present the value of university partnerships toward human resource and service needs. Attendees will gain ideas, tips & resources for initiating and growing a partnership and strategies for university engagement.

 

Brian serves as Community Outreach Director for Old Town Church in Forest Grove, Oregon, and Program Director for the Forest Grove Temporary Emergency Shelters; the program operates in cooperation with the Washington County Severe Weather Shelter Response System. He also serves on the Washington County Continuum of Care (CoC) Board. Prior to this, Brian completed a 20-year career at Intel Corporation as a problem solver and global supply chain innovator.

 

Stephanie Stokamer is the director of the Center for Civic Engagement at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. She has worked with community organizations, faculty, and students for over 15 years to integrate and align educational objectives with addressing local, national, and global problems. She has authored numerous publications and presented nationally on civic education, partnerships between higher education and community organizations, and developing active and informed community members. She also teaches civic engagement courses, including Action for Affordable Housing.

 

Dana Schultz, Central City Concern

 

Portland's HOPE Collaborative: Lessons in A Scattered-Site, Housing-First Approach

 

The HOPE Program is a Permanent Supportive Housing voucher program based in Portland, Oregon serving the most vulnerable and chronically homeless individuals and families in the area. The program houses 141 people in rental homes around the metro region. We use a Housing-First approach to serve HOPE clients and have confronted the many challenges this model poses. But for the HOPE team, many rewarding lessons have been gleaned over the last couple years about implementing Housing First services which could lend some guidance to future Housing-First programs.

 

Dana Schultz is the PSH Manager at Central City Concern, overseeing all supportive and permanent housing programs.


Crystal McIntyre is the HOPE Program Housing Specialist for Central City Concern.


David Rugh is a HOPE Program Peer Support Specialist for Transition Projects, Inc.

 

Bianetth Valdez, HomePlate Youth Services

 

Point in Time Volunteer Training: Community Engagement through Training

 

Please join us for a discussion of approaches to volunteer engagement in the Point in Time Count, a review of successes and challenges in Washington County’s volunteer training and management and sharing ideas for future strategies to engage community members in the PIT!

 

Bianetth Valdez is currently the Outreach Coordinator with HomePlate Youth Services, a drop-in resource center for homeless and unstably housed youth in Washington County. Bianetth graduated from Portland State University with a Masters in Social Work. She also holds a Bachelor’s in Social Work from the University of Texas at Austin (Go Longhorns!) She has almost 9 years of social work experience under her belt, working predominantly with low-income, minority youth. She is passionate about social and racial justice, anti-oppressive work, and housing/homelessness.
Jeanne-Marie Ritter is the Homeless Outreach Service Coordinator at Luke-Dorf Inc., a healing community, providing PATH outreach in Washington County. She has experience in crisis response and counseling, victim advocacy, and homeless outreach. She sits with people in their most challenging places, and after that crochets her cares away.

 

Amy Lamerson, Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio. SOAR Ohio State Lead

SOAR Oregon Review (Wednesday) SOAR Institute (All day Thursday)

SOAR Oregon Review Session: How to improve outcomes.
The SOAR Institute: What Service Providers Need to Know. Breakout sessions as follows.
Introduction to SOAR and free online course access.
SOAR Basics and What SOAR Ohio Looks Like.
SOAR Fundamentals and the Medical Summary Report.
SOAR Special Populations and SOAR, Online Application Tracking.

 

Amy Lamerson, MSW, joined COHHIO in September of 2016. She currently coordinates and manages the SOAR Ohio Project, which works to assist individuals experiencing homelessness with potential SSI/SSDI benefits. Amy previously worked as a Veteran’s Case Manager in the SSVF program and Housing Specialist for Faith Mission, in Columbus, OH. There, she worked in both Men’s and Women’s shelters, assisting with coordination of services in mental health, substance abuse, and rapid rehousing using the Housing First and Critical Time Intervention Models (CTI) with single adults. Amy attended the Ohio State University in Columbus for her Bachelor of Science in Social Work, Minor in Sociology with a Certification in HIV/AIDS Education. She then received an Accelerated Masters in Social Work with a focus in Administration, Policy and Clinical Diagnosis from OSU. During college, she interned for the Ohio Dept. of Health.

 

Marion Kotowski, Douglas County Human Trafficking Task Force, Up2Us Now Child Abuse Prevention Coalition, Mercy Foundation

 

Human Trafficking & High-Risk Populations: Prevent, Identify, Respond

 

Human trafficking is in every state, crosses every educational and socioeconomic boarder but some populations are at higher risk. This presentation will cover the pervasiveness of trafficking, rural vs. urban areas, risk factors and engaging your community to prevent, identify and respond to the incidences of trafficking.

 

Marion Kotowski, Violence Prevention Specialist. Marion has been working in the social service field for over 30 years. Prior to establishing and coordinating the Douglas County Human Trafficking Task Force and serving as the Violence Prevention Specialist for the Up2Us Now Child Abuse Prevention Coalition and Mercy Foundation, Marion worked with severely emotionally disturbed and abused children in residential treatment facilities and schools in northern California as a Behavior Analyst. Marion also held positions as Vice-Principal and Director of Outreach and Support Services identifying and addressing the needs of the high-risk inner-city populations as well as the unique needs of disenfranchised families in rural areas. Marion has called Oregon her home for the past 14 years and now resides in Douglas County.

 

Cari Debban, Bay Area First Step, Inc.

 

Recovery Happens: Addressing discrimination against individuals experiencing homelessness and addiction in rural Oregon

 

Learn the benefits of using success stories to combat prejudice against homelessness, addiction, and mental health issues. There will be a discussion about how unsubstantiated fears about the characteristics of individuals with disabilities influence the land use process. Topics include an overview of protected classes, conditional use permits, the requirement for clear and concise criteria and how they relate to typical zoning regulations and processes. Learn the importance of demonstrating community support during the land use hearing process and understand the need for reform.

 

Cari Debban, CRM is the Recovery Center Director for BAFS. She manages a 24-bed Transitional Housing Program and Drop-In center. Her work involves coordinating housing and services for Coos County Community Corrections, Coos Health and Wellness-Behavioral Health, DHS- Child Welfare, emergency shelter and local treatment provider consumers. She is a Certified Recovery Mentor (CRM) and a lead instructor for Recovery Happens OHA and ACCBO approved Peer Support Specialist training program, for adult addictions.

Patty Sanden, B.S. is the Finance Director for BAFS. Responsible for the organizations finances, contracts, and reporting. She has written many successful State and Federal grants. She earned a bachelor's degree in Business Administration. Patty helped start Coos County's first Drop-In center for homeless teens, the Maslow Project of Coos County. She is the Chair of the Local Alcohol and Drug Planning Committee.

 

Amanda Antenucci, Outside In

 

Working with Trauma Survivors to Find Stabilization in Unsafe Times

 

Vulnerable individuals have reported feeling increasingly unsafe in their communities, including treatment contexts. This presentation will explore how attacks on vulnerable communities impact our work with survivors. The group will also define and explore how practitioners may mirror the trauma experiences of the populations served.

 

Amanda Antenucci, LCSW, MAC is the Clinical Services Manager at Outside In and supervises the mental health and substance abuse treatment programs for this organization. Amanda has worked in trauma treatment in a variety of contexts including outpatient, inpatient, residential, corrections, and community-based.


Joseph Bonnell, MS, QMHP, CRC, CADC III is a counselor providing mental health and addictions treatment at Outside In. . He has experience working with youth experiencing homelessness, people with disabilities, queer and trans folk, and in HIV prevention.

 

Joshua Groesz, The Salvation Army

 

Finding strength after trauma

 

Everyone experiences a little or a lot of trauma in their lives. How does it destroy some, but empower others? "Finding strength after Trauma" reviews Post Traumatic Stress and Post Traumatic Growth and how both can come from a traumatic event. This workshop will present specific strategies on how to work with clients who continue to self-destruct and turn their suffering from constant crises, overwhelming stress, anxiety, and depression into motivation to continue living and enjoy their life being lived.

 

Joshua Groesz MS volunteers on the Board of Director's for OCHH and is one of our keynote speakers for this year's conference. Joshua holds a Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling from Southern Oregon University and after spending two years as the Executive Director for The Salvation Army's Veterans and Family Center in Beaverton Oregon, he is now the Divisional Social Services Director for all of the Salvation Army social service programs in Oregon and Idaho. In this role, he acts a consultant for eight shelters and approximately 20 Salvation Army Corps. Prior to joining the Salvation Army, he spent five years teaching at Portland Community College and Clark College and two years as a program director for a Military helpline and trainer for volunteers taking calls on the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. His wife, Christina, and two beautiful daughters Mia (7) and Simone (3) keep him grounded as he was diagnosed with PTSD after serving a one-year combat tour in Iraq.

 

Ryan Deibert, Joint Office of Homeless Services (City of Portland/Multnomah County)

 

Bringing solutions to scale: How Multnomah County is planning to produce more than 2000 units of supportive housing in the next ten years

 

Ending homelessness means getting real - both about best practices and about scaling to meet actual needs. This session will focus on how Multnomah County and its regional partners are getting real about supportive housing: measuring need, estimating costs, and planning to develop more than 2000 units in ten years.

 

Ryan Deibert began his career in ending homelessness more than 20 years ago, as a street outreach worker with a Health Care for the Homeless Clinic in Chicago. He has since dedicated his career to improving and expanding the programs and community networks that help our neighbors experiencing homelessness get back into housing and health. He's served in a range of program development, implementation and evaluation roles in Washington and Oregon, including as State lead on supportive housing programs for people living with HIV/AIDS. While at the Portland Housing Bureau, he contributed to creating A Home for Everyone - Multnomah County's CoC and community-wide initiative to end homelessness. Ryan holds a Master of Public Health degree, with a focus on social determinants of health. He currently leads strategic analysis, planning, and policy development initiatives as the Manager of Planning, Policy & Performance at the City of Portland/Multnomah County Joint Office of Homeless Services.

 

Connor McDonnell, Oregon Housing & Community Services

 

Connecting McKinney-Vento Liaisons and Continuum of Care: What do effective partnerships look like?

 

TBD

 

Connor McDonnell is a Housing Integrator with Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) where he supports homelessness and affordable housing initiatives across Oregon. He has worked as a housing case manager supporting individuals experiencing homelessness transition into permanent housing, in city government, and prior to OHCS in the local Portland HUD Field Office. He is passionate about supporting local jurisdictions, building permanent supportive housing, and ensuring that our most vulnerable residents have a safe and stable place to call home.

 

Jennifer McDermond, Corvallis Housing First

 

Case Management and Advocacy

 

Case Management a panel discussion: Case Management across the care continuum takes on many different facets which are influenced mainly by different agency objectives. This can cause a “gap” in services coupled with a lack of inner agency cohesion will oftentimes leave the clients and advocates with no clear path to assistance.

 

Jennifer McDermond, QMHA, has worked in the field of social services for over 11-years and enjoys working with those most vulnerable populations. She has obtained Bachelors degrees in Political Science, Music, and Psychology with a minor in Military Science from Oregon State University. As well as maintained continuing education CEUs in Interpersonal Neurobiology through the PCC Climb Center. She lives and works in Corvallis with her family to include 3 furry children and enjoys teaching and hosting Labyrinth walks; as well as, singing and writing for fun.

 

Kai River Blevins, OutServe-SLDN

 

Best Practices for Ensuring Access to Services for Transgender Oregonians

 

Having access to homeless shelters, healthcare, social services, and veterans’ benefits can be lifesaving. The gap in provider competency and ability to appropriately serve transgender people in social service environments varies wildly across the state. Come learn about transgender identities and best practices in a hands-on, inclusive environment. All that is required is for you to bring respect, a desire to learn, and the ability to assume good intentions of others. This session welcomes all learners and encourages everyone to "Be where they are at" in their understanding of transgender people. We will build in flexibility and ample opportunity for interactive dialogue

 

Kai River Blevins (they/them) is the Director of Education, Chapter, & Veteran Services for OutServe-SLDN, and a transgender Army veteran. In this capacity, Kai spearheads the organization's cultural competency and education platforms, manages the organization's membership associations and community partnerships, and works to ensure agents working on behalf of LGBTQ veterans throughout the country have the skills and resources they need to be successful. Kai completed their Master of Legal Studies at Willamette University College of Law, with an emphasis on gender, sexuality, and race, especially transgender legal issues. They completed their bachelor's degree in Political Science and Sociology (magna cum laude) at the University of Colorado Denver.

 

Mikasi Goodwin is a dedicated grassroots organizer who works with the Corvallis Transgender Support Group, The Democratic Socialists of America and Tenants United. She strives to build community organizations that directly empower poor people and give them the tools to fight back against oppression. Her most recent work has been helping found the Benton County Democratic Socialists of America and Corvallis' own tenants union, Tenants United.


Julia McKenna uses gender neutral (they/them/theirs) pronouns. Julia is originally from Pennsylvania where they got their BA in Psychology and minor in Spanish at Penn State. They worked in State College, PA for 3 years at a transitional living program for teenagers, which led them to study public policy. Julia completed their Master of Public Policy at OSU in June of 2015. Julia has content expertise in innovative housing types, community-based solutions to houselessness, and best practices for serving LGBTQ+ people experiencing houselessness.

 

Tim Black, White Bird Clinic

 

CAHOOTS: Crisis Assistance Helping Out on the Streets, an innovative approach to mobile crisis intervention for unhoused populations.

 

Having access to homeless shelters, healthcare, social services, and veterans’ benefits can be lifesaving. The gap in provider competency and ability to appropriately serve transgender people in social service environments varies wildly across the state. Come learn about transgender identities and best practices in a hands-on, inclusive environment. All that is required is for you to bring respect, a desire to learn, and the ability to assume good intentions of others. This session welcomes all learners and encourages everyone to "Be where they are at" in their understanding of transgender people. We will build in flexibility and ample opportunity for interactive dialogue

 

Tim Black is the Operations Coordinator for CAHOOTS and has been a crisis counselor with the program since 2010. Prior to CAHOOTS, Tim has worked in outreach, case management, and crisis services for runaway and homeless youth in Lane County, as well as wilderness therapy and outdoor education.
 

Kate Gillespie is a LCSW and has worked for White Bird for 9 years as a crisis worker and clinical supervisor for the agency. She has worked in the mental health field for nearly two decades; her background includes working in a state psychiatric hospital, emergency department, and non-traditional therapeutic environments like wilderness therapy.

 

Dona Bolt, Oregon Dept. of Education

 

McKinney-Vento in Public Schools: Getting to Graduation

 

We will look at data on homeless children and youth in families, and unaccompanied homeless minors, in all parts of the state, and discuss what school district liaisons are doing to help students attend, succeed in, and graduate from school. Participants will gain familiarity with the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education program, rights of homeless students, requirements of districts and sources of assistance available. Graphs and maps will help illustrate the extent of homelessness in Oregon. Examples of successes, and work still to accomplish, will also be discussed.

 

Dona Bolt has been State Coordinator of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Program at the Oregon Department of Education since 1987. She provides training, dispute resolution and technical assistance for school district Homeless Liaisons, collaboration with Head Start, Child Care programs and Runaway & Homeless Youth shelter providers, and program planning for education initiatives. She has received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children & Youth (2001) and the Oregon Coalition on Housing and Homelessness (2013). In 2017, she received a “Mental Health Hero” award from the Trillium Family Organization.
 

Monica Beemer, Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP)

 

The Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign: Fighting the Criminalization of People who are Homeless and Poor

 

Through WRAP research, the Federal mass-divestment in affordable housing and subsequent massive growth in homelessness became a national discussion and target for organizing. Through street outreach and further intensive research, WRAP also began documenting the steep increase in laws across the country that criminalize people for being poor and homeless. Through 1000’s of interviews of homeless people across the country, we began to document their ideas for solutions to these violent laws. We wrote legislation, the Right to Rest Act, and began organizing from our state bases in Oregon, Colorado and California around the Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign (HBRC). As with all WRAP campaigns, the HBRC brings together grassroots, social justice groups from across the Western U.S. to build our strength and power together while organizing from the base and strengths of each of our own communities’ homeless students, requirements of districts and sources of assistance available. Graphs and maps will help illustrate the extent of homelessness in Oregon. Examples of successes, and work still to accomplish, will also be discussed.

 

Monica Beemer MSW, served as the Director of Sisters of the Road, a nonprofit cafe and community for people experiencing homelessness in Portland, Oregon, from 2001 to 2013 and as Station Manager of KBOO Community Radio from 2014-2017. She has served on the Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP) board for the past 10 years, supporting and organizing with the Homeless Bill of Rights and other WRAP campaigns. Monica is on the National Planning Committee of the Social Welfare Action Alliance, social workers building a movement for radical social change social work in the United States. She is on the Oregon Coordinating Committee for the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. She is from both rural (Newport) and urban (Portland) Oregon.

 

 

Melanie Snippe, Samaritan Health Services – Samaritan Internal Medicine in Corvallis

 

Bringing Primary Care Resources to the Community – 2 Years in the Making

 

The Outreach clinic, formed by collaboration between Samaritan Internal Medicine, Corvallis Housing First, and Corvallis Daytime Drop-in Center continues to have a positive impact on homeless individuals and the surrounding community for the 2nd year in a row. Presentation to provide a clear picture of the benefits of bringing health resources to the community on an individual, organizational, and community-wide level. In some ways, the Outreach clinic has taken on a life of its’ own and helped everyone involved have a better understanding of what it takes to meet the needs of the homeless population in our community.

 

Melanie Snippe currently works as an RN Care Coordinator for Samaritan Internal Medicine in Corvallis. She pursued a career in nursing based on a desire to serve communities with limited access to health resources. She is honored to be a part of Samaritan’s Outreach Clinic initiative and believes that positive outcomes are possible for everyone with the right tools and support.

Jennifer Wilkens is an RN Care Coordinator at Samaritan Internal Medicine Clinic in Corvallis. Her background includes work on a post-op floor, and in pre-op education, and she has Bachelor's degrees in both education and nursing. She has lived all over the United States and even Europe but has chosen to call Oregon home for over a decade. She feels a deep commitment to care coordination, where she can fuse her passions for nursing and education and make a real difference in the lives of her patients. She jumped at the opportunity to be a part of this outreach program to assist individuals with navigating the healthcare system and community resources to improve their overall health.

Amaranta Lopez is a Health Navigator from Benton County Health Department, co-placed at Samaritan Internal Medicine Clinic in Corvallis. Western Oregon University graduate with a Bachelor degree in Community Health Education. Throughout her education she has volunteered in many community service projects to help the low-income population in her community. The highlight of her week is being able to make a positive change to the unhoused and/or impoverished individuals by connecting them to services.

 

 

Gissel Blanca Gonzalez, Catholic Charities, Denver Archdiocese

 

Trauma Informed Approach in a Low Barrier Setting

Participants will be guided through a discussion focusing on Trauma Informed Practices in a low barrier setting. Participants will be asked to contribute to definitions and share their lived experiences on this topic.

 

Gissel Blanca Gonzalez is a program manager of three low barrier emergency shelters for women, in the City of Denver. She is best known for implementing her vision of creating community within shelter, to help participants overcome barriers of homelessness.

 

 

 

Honors Given at OCHH Conference

 

Beverly 'Ma' Curtis

 

This award is given to a homeless or formerly homeless person who has made a significant contribution to ending homelessness. This contribution can take the form of advocacy for the homeless, as a role model for other homeless people, or as a social service provider. The award is a testimony to the inspirational role that Beverly "Ma" Curtis played in the social movement to end homelessness.

 

2018 Winner - Jeff Riddle

 

OCHH Award of Merit - Individual

 

This award is given to an individual who has shown excellence in providing services to alleviate the suffering of homeless men, women, and children.

 

2018 Winner - Delores Burgos

 

OCHH Award of Merit - Organization

 

This award is given to an organization that has shown excellence in providing services to alleviate the suffering of homeless men, women, and children

 

2018 Winner - Community Supported Shelters

 

OCHH Lifetime Achievement Award

 

This special award is given to a person who has given outstanding service to Oregon's homeless and to ongoing support of OCHH and the OCHH conference

 

2018- Ron Hays

 

 

Thank you to all of you that attended 

The 2017 OCHH Annual Conference!

You made it a wonderful success.

 

"The Opportunities of Our Changing Times:

Advocacy, Activism & Action"

September 27-29, 2017

 

We would like to invite you all to join us at our new venue.

 

The Hilton Eugene

Keynote Speakers

 

Marc Dones, Associate Director of Equity Initiatives

 

Dones has worked in program and policy development for their entire career. Currently their work focuses on the development and integration of equity oriented policies and program procedures across a number of projects. In this role Marc focuses on identifying opportunities for addressing systemic health inequities through program and policy modification or development. Additionally, Dones works with a small team of C4 staff to provide training to over 300 provider agencies funded to work with individuals living with substance use disorders. Prior to joining C4 Dones served as a Program Manager in the MA Executive Office of Health and Human services where they assisted in the development and implementation of Governor Deval Patrick’s youth violence reduction program, the Safe and Successful Youth Initiative. The program, with a roughly $9.5 million annual operating budget was developed and implemented in 11 cities with site-specific responses. Mental health and substance use disorder support were key aspects of the program. Additionally, Marc served as the policy manager for the Massachusetts Special Commission on Unaccompanied Homeless Youth. In this capacity they advised the commission, authored its reports, and conducted research on numerous issues.  

 

 

Paul Boden (Executive and Organizing Director, Western Regional Advocacy Project)

 

Paul became homeless at the age of 16. He began volunteering at a drop-in shelter in San Francisco in 1983, eventually becoming a program director there. He then worked as a case manager in a supportive hotel program for mentally ill people. Paul served as Executive Director of San Francisco’s Coalition on Homelessness for 16 years and was a founder of the Community Housing Partnership, a nationally recognized permanent housing corporation with optional supportive services. He served as president of its Board for 10 years. Paul was also a board member of the National Coalition for the Homeless and co-chair of its civil rights and grassroots organizing workgroup. He has received dozens of community awards during the last twenty-five years and recognition from the city and county of San Francisco, the State of California, and the Congress of the United States. Paul regularly writes articles and op-eds and travels throughout the country giving talks and trainings.

 

 

Dona Bolt, State Coordinator of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Program at the Oregon Department of Education

 

Dona has been State Coordinator of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Program at the Oregon Department of Education since 1987. In addition to grant program coordination, she provides training and technical assistance for school district staff and service providers on the educational rights of homeless families and youth, and how to facilitate their school attendance and success. Her role includes providing assistance for homeless parents and unaccompanied youths with to resolve disputes with schools and districts, as well as regional coordination with her counterparts in other Northwestern states.

For thirty years, Dona has organized and shared the data collected by this McKinney-Vento program, documenting the extent and ever-upward trend in the number of homeless families and unaccompanied youths in Oregon. The work involves networking and collaboration with government and non-profit agencies, including Head Start, child care programs, early intervention, runaway and homeless youth service providers, dropout prevention programs, Continuums of Care, Community Action agencies, shelters, housing, and health programs and many others.  

Dona received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children & Youth (2001) and the Oregon Coalition on Housing and Homelessness (2013).  An avid birder, she contributes regularly to the Cornell University eBird database. Dona and her husband Jeff are longtime residents of Salem, where they raise backyard chickens and a variety of house pets.

 

Kenny LaPoint, Assistant Director, Public Affairs for Oregon Housing and Community Services

 

Kenny has over 13 years of housing and community development experience. Prior to his service with the State of Oregon, Mr. LaPoint spent six years as the Housing and Resident Services Director for Housing Works, the Central Oregon Regional Housing Authority. Mr. LaPoint also served for over three years as a Homeownership Counselor for NeighborImpact, Central Oregon’s Community Action Agency.  Other prior service includes Co-Chair of Central Oregon’s Homeless Leadership Coalition (the region’s Continuum of Care); a member of the City of Bend’s Affordable Housing Committee, President of the Cascade Chapter of NAHRO (National Association of Housing Redevelopment Officials), Neighborhood Partnership’s Board of Directors, member of the Community Advisory Council for Central Oregon’s Coordinated Care Organization and one of the founding members of Icon City, a Central Oregon non-profit organization. 

 

Conference Sponsors

 

Red Diamond Sponsors

OCHH Welcomes Back & Sincerely Thanks Our Returning Sponsor

 

Diamond Sponsors

 

Alexandrite Sponsors

 

OCHH Welcomes Back & Sincerely Thanks Our Returning Sponsor

 

Beyond the Box Strategies, LLC

Jo Zimmer

 

 

Rural Oregon Continuum of Care

 

Seminars & Workshops

 

Julia McKenna, Fair Housing Council of Oregon

 

Transgender Access to Shelter: Best Practices, Training Resources, and hands-on learning with scenarios, Q&A, and interactive problem-solving in small groups

 

Transgender Access to Shelter: Best Practices, Training Resources, and hands-on learning with scenarios, Q&A, and interactive problem-solving in small groups. Come learn about transgender identities and best practices in a hands-on, inclusive environment. All that is required is for you to bring respect, a desire to learn, and the ability to assume good intentions of others. This session welcomes all learners and encourages everyone to "Be where they are at" in their understanding of transgender people. We will aim to cover a lot of content, and will build in flexibility and ample opportunity for interactive dialogue. Become familiar with transgender 101 terminology and identities. Identify assumptions, beliefs, and personal identities related to gender that we hold as individuals and as a culture. Work through transgender 201 scenarios and role-plays in small groups. Address real-world concerns and problem-solve as a small group and through Q&A with the larger group.

 

 

Ken Kraybill, Director of Training, t3

 

Facilitating Motivational Conversations

 

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative conversation style for strengthening a person’s own commitment and motivation to change. This interactive session will provide a “taste” of the spirit, processes and skills of MI in talking with people about change. 

Training Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the relevance of MI in homeless services
  • Explain the four processes that guide MI conversations
  • Demonstrate the skills of reflective listening and open questions

 

Alison McIntosh & Jenny Lee, Housing Policy Director, Neighborhood Partnerships and the Oregon Housing Alliance

 

Legislative & Local Advocacy Training: Strategic communication to create housing opportunity

 

Communities all across Oregon are experiencing a housing crisis, and homelessness is increasing. Our cities, counties, and our state Legislature need to act to address the housing crisis by improving policies and dedicating resources to solve these problems. The Oregon Housing Alliance will be working in the Oregon Legislature in 2018 and 2019 with significant policy agendas to address the housing crisis. Come to this session to learn more about effective advocacy tools and strategies for your local city or county government, to learn more about what's being proposed to the Legislature in 2018 and beyond, and to learn how you can get involved!

 

 

Tamara Sale, Director of the EASA Center for Excellence at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health; Cara Sams, MA, LPC,Program Director for the Washington and Clackamas County Early Assessment and Support Alliance Programs (EASA) and the Clackamas County Transition Age Youth Program; Michael Haines, director of peer support services for EASA and the Young Adult Hub at PeaceHealth in Lane County.

 

Psychosis During Early Adulthood:  Best Practices and Collaboration for Preventing Homelessness

 

Oregon's EASA program is the longest-standing statewide dissemination of evidence-based early psychosis intervention in the United States. Presenters will describe EASA goals and methods, the unique needs of young adults, particularly those with psychosis, collaborations with homelessness prevention entities, and opportunities for collaboration.

 

 

Erika Silver, Human Services Manager for Clackamas County. Erin Schwartz, Senior Policy Analyst for Clackamas County

 

Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparity: A Data Driven and Action Oriented Approach

 

Who’s finding your front door? Who’s getting served through your programs? Who’s not? Are outcomes

consistent across populations? What disparities exist? How can you address them? We will provide methodology to analyze data for racial and ethnic disparities, a case study and a range of action steps to address disparity.

 

 

Ken Kraybill, Director of Training, t3

 

Overview of Best Practices in Homeless Services

 

Understanding and implementing what we’ve learned from experience and research over the past decades is essential to effectively address the complex needs of people experiencing homelessness. This workshop will provide an overview of selected “person-centered, housing-focused, trauma-informed, recovery-oriented, peer-integrated, self-compassionate” approaches that inform our work.

Training Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the four elements of the mindset and heart-set of best practices
  • Name and describe three best practices and their relevance in this work

 

Lisa DeSalvio, Director of Special Programs for the Coos Bay School District.; Melinda Torres, district homeless liaison and the ARK Project Manager.

 

The ARK Project: How building collaborative relationships produced a productive resource center that provides basic needs and self-sufficiency services to support homeless children and youth be successful in school and life.

 

The ARK project is a school and community based resource center for homeless youth and families. We will provide information on how the center is operated, the services we provide and the process of developing a model program since it can be duplicated in other areas.

 

 

Dona Bolt, State Coordinator, McKinney-Vento Homeless Education, Oregon Dept. of Education

 

School District Liaisons: Making Connections for Families and Unaccompanied Youths

 

The McKinney-Vento Act’s Education of Homeless Children & Youth Program requires all districts to have a trained Liaison to identify and assist families, children and youths to access and succeed in school. We will review the types of services available from districts, data trends, and opportunities for local collaboration.

 

 

Robin Davis, Joint Office of Homeless Services

 

Culturally-Responsive & Trauma-Informed Approaches to working with Domestic Violence survivors

 

This workshop will provide an overview of Domestic Violence and the unique challenges that survivors in marginalized communities experience in accessing safety.

 

 

Diane Hess is the Education & Outreach Director of Fair Housing Council of Oregon; Louise Dix, Education and Outreach Specialist for FHCO

 

Civil Rights in Housing and Shelters: Fundamentals and New Developments in Fair Housing Laws

 

Knowledge of fair housing laws, that protect civil rights in housing and shelters, is critical for homeless advocates and shelter providers. This seminar is packed with useful information, including historical context, a review of all relevant laws, and new legal developments.                      

• Global overview of the powerful hidden history of housing discrimination and the evolution of fair housing laws; • Tools for advocacy with homeless individuals/those at risk of becoming homeless. • Legal responsibilities of shelters and transitional housing programs under fair housing law

 

 

Dan Bryant, SquareOne Villages

 

Dream Big with Tiny Homes, Starting at SquareOne

 

The story of how SquareOne Villages was created out of the Occupy movement to provide a new model of shelter and how they became a developer of tiny homes for affordable housing.

 

 

Renee Yandel, HIV Alliance. Amanda McCluskey

 

Overdose Prevention & Harm Reduction: What can you do to save lives?

 

Opiate related overdose is a critical issue for everyone. In 2014, approximately 1.9 million Americans 12 years or older had opioid use disorder due to prescription drugs and nearly 600,000 due to heroin use. Harm Reduction strategies like the overdose reversal drug, naloxone, can save lives.

 

 

Lucille Oeder, LPN, Care Coordinator at Samaritan Internal Medicine; Jennifer Wilkens, RN, Care Coordinator at Samaritan Internal Medicine Clinic

 

Connecting the Dots: A Care Coordination Model for the Chronically Homeless

 

Data will be shared from a pilot project that placed two care coordinators and a health navigator in the Corvallis Daytime Drop-In Center, serving Corvallis-area men, women and families who are homeless or who were at risk of becoming homeless.

 

 

Julia McKenna, Fair Housing Council of Oregon

 

Innovative Approaches to Shelter Design and Building Technology: Seeing is Believing!

 

Addressing homelessness becomes overwhelming very quickly and many times the conversation becomes abstract and unmanageable. Come see a presentation of inspiring pictures and short videos of some of the most innovative approaches to shelter across the world. Get a new idea and brainstorm with others about new opportunities to work toward creative solutions to homelessness. Think outside the box and learn the leading innovations for responses to natural disasters and refugee crises to see how they might be relevant to addressing homelessness.

 

 

Ken Kraybill, Director of Training, t3

 

An Introduction to Critical Time Intervention

 

Critical Time Intervention (CTI) is time-limited approach to help people successfully make the transition from homelessness to housing and life in the community. In this session, we will examine the history, principles, key characteristics, and phases of the CTI approach. In addition, we will practice the basic skills of a CTI-focused conversation.

Training Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain how CTI differs from other support models
  • Identify three principles of the CTI approach
  • Describe the main focus of each of the three phases of CTI

 

Joshua Groesz, MS, The Salvation Army

 

Hooked on chaos: One Infantry soldier's story from the war in Iraq, withdrawing from it afterwards, and how he became the executive director of a transitional housing facility that supports over 60 veterans experiencing homelessness

 

Approximately 1,341 veterans in Oregon are homeless (HUD, 2016) and the Salvation Army's Veterans and Family Center (VFC) provides transitional housing to almost 5% of them. This workshop will cover the addictive nature of war, withdrawing from it afterwards, and how the Salvation Army is reducing the number of veterans being homeless. Attendees will gain insight to common triggers experienced by veterans and learn strategies the Salvation Army is implementing to help homeless veterans find permanent housing, increase their income, and increase their self-determination.

 

 

Jimmy Jones, Director of the Community Resource Program ("The ARCHES Project") at Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency

 

Coordinated Assessment and The Housing First Experience in Salem

 

In October of 2016, Marion and Polk Counties started the areas first Coordinated Entry program, with the goal of finding, assessing and generating data on the complete homeless population in our two counties. Prior to that date, we had very little statistical information on our homeless population. Since that time, we have assessed more than 1,000 households using national assessment tools, generating more than 100 data points per homeless household. In July of 2017, in collaboration with the Salem Housing Authority, we began referring clients to the Homeless Rental Assistance Program--a PSH program for the most vulnerable members of our community.

 

 

Tatiana Dierwechter, MSW, Health Policy and Prevention Manager for Benton County Health Department's Healthy Communities Program; Sara Hartstein, MPH,Senior Health Policy Specialist at Benton County Health Department; Shawn Collins, MS, Administrator of the Housing Opportunities Action Council (HAOC)

 

Using a Public Health Framework to Update a 10 Year Plan to Address Homelessness: Benton County's Experiences in Community Engagement and Cross-Sector Partnership Building

 

Access to safe, affordable housing is a major determinant of health for both individuals and whole communities. In 2016-17, the City of Corvallis, Benton County, and Samaritan Health Services funded the Benton County Health Department to facilitate, in coordination with the Housing Opportunities Action Council (HOAC), a 9 month community engagement and planning process to update the County's 10 Year Plan to Address Homelessness. This presentation will provide an overview of Benton County Health Department's (BCHD) experience using a "health in all policies(HiAP)approach" to engage community partners, grassroots leaders, policy makers, and persons experiencing housing instability and homelessness in updating and ensuring a robust community plan to end homelessness.This approach models how public health can play an important role in promoting a comprehensive, cross-sector,

systems approach to preventing homelessness and improving community health.

 

 

Jeanne-Marie Ritter, M.Ed./Ed.S., Luke-Dorf, Inc. Christina Graslie, B.A., Outreach Worker

 

Reaching Out Without Hesitation: Disrupting Pity, Bias, and Oppression in Homeless Street Outreach

 

Effective street outreach prevents harm to clients and workers alike, while respecting human dignity and meeting basic needs in a variety of settings. How can street outreach teams disrupt the dynamics of pity, bias, and oppression to provide valuable engagement to clients and community partners?

 

 

Pastor Mike Cross, Free on the Outside. An adult only church, Celebrate recovery, and housing provider; Rick German, Assoc. Pastor & Resource Specialist; Caedmon, Assoc. Pastor & Spiritual Director; Mike J, Housing Manager; Caryn F, Additional Housing Resources

 

Challenges of Housing and Social Re-Integration for People with a Sex Offense

 

Housing, support and accountability for people with a sex offense. Houselessness for people with a sex offense is an epidemic across the United States. Lack of social support and a safe place to find acceptance, grace or work many do not engage in treatment for rehab and accountability, but live in isolation as modern-day lepers.

 

 

Cari Debban, CRM, Recovery Center Director for Bay Area First Step; Tasha Stafford, NCAC I, CADC I, CRM, Outreach Director for BAFS; Patty Sanden, B.S.B.A., Finance Director for BAFS

 

Recovery Happens: Addressing homelessness, addiction, and mental health in rural Oregon

 

Learn the benefits of using peer delivered services to address homelessness, addiction, and mental health in rural communities. There will be a discussion about the coordinated assessment and intake process. Training topics include recovery mentor best practices, recognizing trauma associated with homelessness, encouraging prosocial behavior, with an emphasis on using a person-centered approach.

 

 

Paul Boden, Ex. Director, Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP); Monica Beemer, WRAP; Karissa Moden, Sisters of the Road

 

Without Housing Decades of Federal Housing Cutbacks & Massive Homelessness: A Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign Discussion

 

The Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign (HBRC) is a grassroots organizing campaign fighting to end the

criminalization of poor and homeless people’s existence led by the Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP). Join us for a discussion of criminalization in your community and the HBRC!

 

 

Ken Kraybill, Director of Training, t3

 

Understanding Trauma and Trauma Informed Care

 

Using a trauma-informed approach is vital to providing effective services. This session will provide an overview of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual impact of trauma, principles and practices of a trauma-informed approach, and the difference between trauma-informed care and trauma-specific services.

Training Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Give three examples of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual impact of trauma
  • Name two trauma-informed care principles
  • Describe three ways to put a trauma-informed approach into practice

 

 

The 2016 OCHH Annual Conference was a

Great Success!

 

"Human Rights: Everyone Counts"

 

Held November 2-4, 2016

 

We want to thank all of our attendees, presenters and keynote speakers for their contribution to this success.

 

We would also like to thank Seven Feathers Casino Resort, Canyonville, OR

 

2016 Keynote Speakers

 

Paul Boden

Executive and Organizing Director of WRAP (Western Regional Advocacy Project).

 

Paul became homeless at the age of 16. He began volunteering at a drop-in shelter in San Francisco in 1983, eventually becoming a program director there. He then worked as a case manager in a supportive hotel program for mentally ill people. Paul served as Executive Director of San Francisco’s Coalition on Homelessness for 16 years and was a founder of the Community Housing Partnership, a nationally recognized permanent housing corporation with optional supportive services. He served as president of its Board for 10 years. Paul was also a board member of the National Coalition for the Homeless and co-chair of its civil rights and grassroots organizing workgroup. He has received dozens of community awards during the last twenty-five years and recognition from the city and county of San Francisco, the State of California, and the Congress of the United States. Paul regularly writes articles and op-eds and travels throughout the country giving talks and trainings.

 

Martin Rafferty

Executive Director of Youth M.O.V.E. Oregon (YMO).

 

YMO is a statewide, peer-run, youth empowerment non-profit organization that operations in 11 counties across the state. Martin and YMO have won several state and national awards for their work, including an international video award for its best practices. Most recently Martin was featured in the Huffington Post being called the Next Generation Advocate for his work in Oregon and Nationally.

Martin was a winner of the 2010 Ma Curtis award and was homeless as a youth before being adopted. He spends a great deal of his time educating stake holders on effective youth programming and engagement. He is an advisory board member for the Children’s Mental Health Network and has been a dedicated voice for Assisted Out Patient Treatment. His outstanding work is behind many national products such as the Mental Health Youth Bill of Rights and the creation of a leadership program, called ERA, for youth who identify as “system weary”.

A prime example of Martin’s work includes a community based event put on by YMO in response to a school shooting that brought national attention in Troutdale, Oregon. The event brought together over 220 youth who were affected from the traumatic event. State media suggested that “YMO [had] found a way for communities to respond to these ever increasing tragedies” in an effective way. This work continued in the tragic events last year at UCC. YMO is still operating services for UCC students.

Martin provides technical assistance to youth serving systems and organizations across the state and the country. For example, YMO’s model is being duplicated in Kentucky where the organization is recreating three drop in centers and utilizing YMO’s programming to work with young adults in their community. 

 

Claire Seguin

Interim Director, Oregon Housing and Community Services

 

Claire Seguin currently serves as Interim Director of Oregon Housing and Community Services. She joined the Department in January 2015 after serving five years as Executive Director for both the Neighborhood Economic Development Corporation (“NEDCO”) and Community LendingWorks, its affiliate community development financial institution, which provide coordinated and comprehensive asset building programs to Lane, Marion, and Clackamas counties in Oregon. 

Ms. Seguin has over 25 years of experience in community development during which time she has lead successful community development corporations in southern California and Oregon, built affordable housing, worked on urban revitalization and has been a strong advocate for anti-poverty programs. She attended the University of Arizona and has completed executive education programs at San Diego State University in 2002, Indiana University in 2006 and the Harvard Business School in 2007.

 

A Continuing Thank you to our 2016 Conference Sponsors!

 

Red Diamond Sponsors:

 

 

 

 

 Diamond Sponsors:

 

Alexandrite Sponsors:

Jean Lasater

 

Fire Opal Sponsors:

Conference at a Glance

2016 at a glance.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [720.4 KB]

Conference Presentations

 

WRAP - Paul Boden
WRAP - Without Housing Presentation - Pa[...]
Adobe Acrobat document [3.3 MB]
Sex Trafficking 101 - Amanda Monaco
Sex Trafficking 101 6.7.16 for Distro - [...]
Adobe Acrobat document [3.1 MB]
Safe Here - Cristina Clerico
Safe Here.OCHH - Cristina Clerico.docx
Microsoft Word document [25.4 KB]
Safe Here - Cristina Clerico
OCHH.Handouts.2016 - Cristina Clerico.do[...]
Microsoft Word document [37.2 KB]
Mindfulness Teens - Safe Here - Cristina Clerico
Mindfulness.Teens - Safe Here - Cristina[...]
Microsoft Word document [35.8 KB]
Collaborating Across Systems - Patricia McLean
Collaborating Across Systems - Patricia [...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [707.5 KB]
Fair Housing Council of Oregon - Diane Hess
Fair Housing Council of Oregon Presentat[...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [3.8 MB]
First Hour Needs - Rick Burton
First Hour Needs Power Point - Rick Burt[...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [6.2 MB]
Hearing Voices - Nathan Fiedler
Hearing Voices - Nathan Fiedler.pptx
Microsoft Power Point presentation [280.2 KB]
Mental Health First Aid - Amara Thelen
Mental Health First Aid Handout - Amara [...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [4.3 MB]
Not as Different as We Think - Erika Silver
Not as Different as We Think - Erika Sil[...]
Adobe Acrobat document [17.9 MB]
Trauma Informed Approaches to Working with LGBTQ Youth in Housing and Treatment Services - Amanda Antenucci
Trauma Informed Approaches to Working wi[...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [1.4 MB]
HTAG - Lessons Learned - Jim Caplan
OCHHs Conference 2016 Lessons Learned - [...]
Microsoft Power Point presentation [3.9 MB]
HTAG - Goals & Priorities - Jim Caplan
Homeless Transitions Action Group Februa[...]
Microsoft Word document [97.0 KB]

Conference Workshops and Seminars

 

 

 

Paul Boden

Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP)

 

Presentation: The Homeless Bill of Rights is a grassroots organizing campaign fighting to end the criminalization of poor and homeless people's existence. The campaign strives to ensure that all people have the basic right to live where they choose without fear of harassment and criminalization at the hands of the police.

 

Synopsis: The Homeless Bill of Rights is a grassroots organizing campaign fighting to end the criminalization of poor and homeless people's existence. The campaign strives to ensure that all people have the basic right to live where they choose without fear of harassment and criminalization at the hands of the police. This campaign is a way of working collectively with groups possessing different talents to address the many injustices that we face in our communities. We are building the power to create a social justice movement that will create a society where we can all thrive. The goals and priorities of the campaign come from the results of 1,000s of street outreach surveys to people in various cities being criminalized for sitting, lying, resting, sleeping and eating while poor and/or homeless. The campaign includes a legislative strategy, a grassroots organizing strategy to engage organizations through community forums and direct action, and media and legal strategies.

 

 

Veronica Guerra

Oregon Health Authority

Kenny LaPoint

Oregon Housing and Community Services

 

Presentation: The state’s efforts to integrate health care and supportive housing for individuals served by Medicaid.

 

Synopsis: To promote population health and further address social determinants of health, Oregon proposes to create a five-year pilot program under the 1115 waiver demonstration, referred to as the Coordinated Health Partnerships (CHP), for adults at risk of homelessness, including adults eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid programs (often referred to as dual eligibles), and families. Through the CHPs, at-risk populations would be offered a combination of housing, health care integration, care transitions and supportive services to improve health outcomes and reduce Medicaid costs.  The CHPs interventions are designed to help communities across Oregon adopt a multi-faceted and multi-sectoral approach to simultaneously address issues around access to health and health care and those of the physical environment such as housing that affect behavioral and physical health outcomes among those served by Medicaid. The CHPs serve as an unprecedented opportunity to address policy, system, organizational and individual level changes through the development of new community-based partnerships that focus on transitions of care and stable, affordable housing. The CHPs will also offer an effective set of strategies for improving health and health care for underserved individuals, communities and populations across Oregon.

 

 

Eileen Chanti

Barbara Miller

First Place Family Center - First Place Kids/Early Childhood Center

 

Presentation: Reaching the Invisible Children-- A Wraparound Model for Homeless Families with Young Children: How a therapeutic early childhood program provides education, respite, and support for unhoused families with young children. This is a model accessible to all, and can be replicated in your community.

 

Synopsis: Young children and their families who are experiencing homelessness and/or trauma, have unique needs that may have long term effects on growth and development. Our program reaches children who may be otherwise invisible until schooling becomes compulsory. Come hear about this wonderful therapeutic and trauma based program and learn and explore the process for replication in your own community.

 

 

Erika Silver

Amy Dowd

Angie Drake

Clackamas County Social Services

 

Presentation: Not as Different as we Think: Integrating Domestic Violence into Coordinated Housing Systems

 

Synopsis: Many communities’ domestic violence and homeless systems function separately despite many shared participants. We will describe a practical and trauma-informed model for integration, streamlining and increasing access for survivors, capturing needed data, overcoming barriers to partnership and maximizing the resources of both systems. Attendees will also discuss their needs and concerns.

 

 

Jamie Sanchez

Betsy Cunningham

Citizens Education & Advocacy, Homeless Action Project

 

Presentation: Guerrilla Advocacy: Making Sure Everyone Counts

 

Synopsis: According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, an advocate is- “a person who argues for or supports a cause or policy.” Each one of us is an advocate and our advocacy can make the difference. Lack of advocacy enslaves: Good advocacy empowers.
Learn how to empower through learning the skills of a "Guerrilla Advocate".
For anyone working in any helping profession, the ability to advocate for your clients and supporting interventions that lead to positive change is a vital part of your job. Your role is to meet your clients where they are and to work towards empowering them by providing the necessary tools and resources needed to build a sense of self-efficacy within their environment in order to become their own advocate. Guerrilla advocacy can help you do that.

 

 

Amara Thelen, M.Ed.

Options for Southern Oregon

 

Presentation: Mental Health First Aid

 

Synopsis: A Mental Health First Aider has a better understanding of the impact mental illness has on a person and their function in the community. We will learn an action plan to assess, select and implement appropriate interventions, and secure appropriate care for a person experiencing a mental health problem.

 

 

Patricia J. McLean

Jaclyn Eaton

Blair Schaeffer-Blisht

Jake Mendenhall

Human Solutions, Inc.

 

Presentation: Collaborating Across Systems

 

Synopsis: Housing services providers in Multnomah County are collaborating with employment services to provide rent assistance for job seekers who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness, enabling them to complete training and attain their career goals. Panel presentation and workgroup activities will be focused on foundations for successful collaborations across systems.

 

 

Anna Sage, B.S.

David Rugh

Dana Schultz

Central City Concern
HOPE Collaborative

 

Presentation: From Homeless to Housed: How the HOPE Collaborative is utilizing Housing First and Harm Reduction models to house and empower vulnerable and chronically homeless adults and families.

 

Synopsis: Central City Concern's HOPE Collaborative and Permanent Supportive Housing Choice Voucher programs: what we are, who we serve and how we draw on the principles of Housing First and Harm Reduction models to best serve our participants, their families and the community.

 

 

Rick Burton

Juliana Marez

Douglas County School District #4 Roseburg

 

Presentation: First Hour Needs This presentation is focused on students but could be easily adapted to any social service model.

 

Synopsis: First Hour Needs are key to student success. Investing just a few key elements into a student’s morning, and filling in the gaps to their ability to engage as equals in their learning community, can make all the difference. It reduces absences, behavior referrals, and drop outs. Learn the facts, strategies and the stories that lead to success. Some of our most challenging students can become some of our most earnest learners if given the right tools to start their day.

 

 

Gene McVae

Oxford House Outreach Services for the State of Oregon and California

 

Presentation: The Oxford House Model, Understanding to Implementation or Social network support for recovery with abstinence: the Oxford House Model

 

Synopsis: Upon completion, participant will be able to understand the foundation, role and support the Oxford House (OH) recovery home model can have in a treatment approach as a tool in the Recovery Oriented Systems of Care [ROSC]. Participants will also have the tools necessary to begin coordination with the National Organization to implement the model in their area.

 

 

Amanda Antenucci, LCSW

Emily Etzkorn

Outside In

 

Presentation: Trauma Informed Approaches to Working with LGBTQ Youth in Housing and Treatment Services

 

Synopsis: Outside In offers mental health and substance use treatment as well as case management and housing resources to transition age youth (17-24). In this workshop we will present models used to treat, support and house LGBTQ youth in treatment, case management and milieu contexts. This workshop will be interactive, supportive and focused on implementing trauma informed practices.

 

 

Megan Shultz

Martin Rafferty

Rayin Jordan

Transformational Community Alignment (TCA) is helping organizations solve problems through assessment, planning and innovation.

 

Presentation: The 15th Night Initiative: A Youth Centered Community Movement to End Youth Homelessness

 

Synopsis: What does it take to end youth homelessness in your community? This workshop will provide you with an overview of the 15th Night Initiative; a youth centered community movement working across systems, engaging the community and helping youth access resources and services in real time.

 

 

Celeste Goulding

United Church of Christ

 

Presentation: Organizing while making Obsolete; Emergency shelter in Semi-Rural Oregon

 

Synopsis: Hear and discuss one journey of organizing in semi-rural OR to provide severe weather shelter and the intentions of moving forward. Informed by compassion and justice this volunteer based shelter has been operating 8 years, transitioning to guaranteed nights in 2015; and is looking toward adequate housing for all.

 

 

Andrea Myhre

Kendra Phillips Neal

Jackson Street Youth Services

 

Presentation: Collaboration Success: What Makes Working Together Work

 

Synopsis: Collaboration is a basic concept of human culture, yet why do we struggle? Working together is an art form that takes patience, creativity, proper tools, and the knowledge to use them. Learn about the collaboration continuum (cooperation to collective impact) and the elements of working together -relationships, power, and communication.

 

 

Ross Banister D.Min., NAADAC II

Chaplain to the Marginalized, Housing Transitions Action Group Douglas County (HTAG)

 

Presentation: A Drop In Center for Douglas County

 

Synopsis: Providing a setting where the homeless in our community can go to access basic needs and other community resources to help transition them into permanent housing and to gain employment or systems assistance.

 

 

Nathan Fiedler, MA, QMHP

Deschutes County Behavioral Health

 

Presentation: Hearing Voices: Improving Communication with People Living with Voices, Spirits, Visions, and Other Unique Experiences

 

Synopsis: In our work to end homelessness, we undoubtedly will encounter individuals who experience a reality that we find unusual or maybe even disturbing: voices, visions, spirits, and bizarre beliefs just to name a few. This presentation aims to help participants become more comfortable in these interactions, improve outcomes for those living with unusual experiences, and offer ideas we can take back to our communities to foster inclusiveness and understanding.

 

 

Jim "Cap" Caplan

Ross Banister

Mike Fieldman

Merten Bangemann-Jonhnson

Bryan Trenkle

Brian Prawitz

Lance Colley

Homeless Transitions Action Group (HTAG), a cooperative formed by United Community Action Network, Greater Douglas United Way, Housing Authority of Douglas County, BP Media, ADAPT, Downtown Roseburg Association, and NeighborWorks Umpqua

 

Presentation: Building Public Support for Meeting the Challenges Faced by Homeless People and the Communities They Live In: Lessons from the Homeless Transitions Action Group in Douglas County, Oregon

 

Synopsis: After a year-long, grass-roots, and sometimes controversial effort, a group of cooperating agencies and individuals has developed fourteen projects that provide a comprehensive approach to dealing with homelessness in the Roseburg Area and elsewhere in Douglas County, Oregon. This group calls itself the Homeless Transitions Action Group of HTAG. Currently, nine of the fourteen projects are staffed and work is on-going with broad-based community support. A panel of representatives from HTAG will discuss how public process was used to help homeless people, property owners, and the general public.

 

 

Diane Hess

Louise Dix

Fair Housing Council of Oregon

 

Presentation: Civil Rights in Housing and Shelters: Fundamentals and New Developments in Fair Housing Laws

 

Synopsis: Knowledge of fair housing laws, that protect civil rights in housing and shelters, is critical for advocates and shelter providers. This seminar is packed with useful information, including historical context, a review of relevant laws, and new developments, including HUD’s rulings on criminal history, harassment and protection for trans shelter residents.
Note: This seminar fits both “Social/Legal/Criminalization Issues and Diversity/Race/LGBTQ

 

 

Marcia Hall

Melanie Prummer

Battered Persons Advocacy, The Ford Family Foundation, Casa de Belen (This presentation is a joint effort between multiple agencies)

 

Presentation: Paper Tigers: A Trauma Informed Care Documentary and Accompanying Discussion

 

Synopsis: Paper Tigers is a documentary directed by James Redford which focuses on the Trauma Informed Care techniques practiced at Lincoln Alternative High School in Walla Walla, Washington. The film follows a group of at-risk students and their experiences both at school and home. It highlights the positive impact a consistent, caring adult can have on these students’ lives. This screening will be followed by a discussion

 

 

Alison McIntosh

Jenny Lee

Neighborhood Partnerships and the Oregon Housing Alliance

 

Presentation: Housing and Homelessness: Oregon Housing Alliance's 2017 Legislative Agenda & Local Advocacy Training

 

Synopsis: Communities all across Oregon are experiencing a housing crisis, and homelessness is increasing. In 2017, the Oregon Housing Alliance will be presenting a significant legislative agenda designed to begin to address all pieces of the housing crisis - from homelessness to tenant protections to more affordable housing to homeownership and everything in between. Come to this session to learn more about what's being proposed and how you can get involved! We need all of us working together Communities across Oregon are experiencing a housing crisis. In 2017, the Oregon Housing Alliance will have a significant legislative agenda which will begin to address the housing crisis - from homelessness to affordable housing to homeownership and everything in between. Come and learn what's being proposed.

The 2017 Legislative Agenda for the Oregon Housing Alliance will be significant. It will include requests to prevent and end homelessness, protect tenants, build more affordable housing and preserve the housing we have, and increase homeownership options. It will take all of us working together to achieve these goals and pass new funding for affordable housing.
Participants will learn about what is on the agenda for the Housing Alliance in 2017, as well as how they can get involved in the Legislative session. They will also take away messages that work to use with local elected officials and legislators.
In addition, we’ll spend some time talking about some tools the Legislature passed in 2016 that give local communities more options to address the housing crisis, and participants will get information and tools to advocate with local elected officials to implement these new strategies.

 

 

Cristina Clerico

Samaritan House, Inc. Family Transitional Shelter
Second Home, Lincoln County
Lincoln Community Dispute Resolution

 

Presentation: Safe Here: A trauma-informed approach for systems and the people within them

 

Synopsis: Understand how trauma can affect you, your clients and your community. Learn and explore ideas that will help you grow and feel emotionally safe and feel confident that you can extend that sense of safety to the people with whom you work

 

 

Amanda Monaco

Oregon Department of Justice

Shannon Meyer

FBI Victims Specialist

 

Presentation: Sex Trafficking 101

 

Synopsis: An overview of what sex trafficking of minors looks like. From how the victimization starts, to the trauma bond that keeps them, and then what it takes to help victims heal and get out. Includes how to identify the red flags, and tips when working with victims. We will also cover what is being done statewide to combat this issue.

 

OCHH Annual Awards

 

Honors Given at OCHH Conference

 

OCHH ANNUAL CONFERENCE AWARD WINNERS!

Congratulations!!

 

Beverly "Ma" Curtis Award

This award is given to a homeless or formerly homeless person who has made a significant contribution to ending homelessness. This contribution can take the form of advocacy for the homeless, as a role model for other homeless people, or as a social service provider. The award is a testimony to the inspirational role that Beverly "Ma" Curtis played in the social movement to end homelessness.

 

2016 Winner - Paul Boden, Western Regional Advocacy Project

 

OCHH Award of Merit - Individual Award

This award is given to an individual who has shown excellence in providing services to alleviate the suffering of homeless men, women, and children.

 

2016 Winner - Cristina Clerico

 

OCHH Award of Merit - Organization Award

This award is given to an organization that has shown excellence in providing services to alleviate the suffering of homeless men, women, and children

 

2016 Winner - First Place Family Center

 

OCHH Lifetime Achievement Award

This special award is given to a person who has given outstanding service to Oregon's homeless and to ongoing support of OCHH and the OCHH conference

 

2016 - Jean Lasater

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